High Brew Coffee dumping stevia for cane sugar

by Ron Sterk
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High Brew Coffee with no stevia
High Brew Coffee is debuting three new recipes of its Mexican vanilla, salted caramel and dark chocolate mocha flavors made with cane sugar.

AUSTIN, TEXAS — High Brew Coffee, a leader in ready-to-drink cold-brew coffee based in Austin, said it has decided to switch from stevia to cane sugar as part of its mission to provide a higher standard in coffee.

The company is getting ready to debut three new recipes of its Mexican vanilla, salted caramel and dark chocolate mocha flavors made with cane sugar. The new flavors will remain under 100 calories per 8-oz can with 14 grams of sugar. After research and numerous taste tests, the new recipes will be made using only cane sugar, keeping their hint of sweetness, the company said. The revamped formulas allow for a more robust flavor profile and a first-rate taste that has less acidity than the average cup of coffee, according to High Brew coffee.

David Smith, High Brew Coffee
David Smith, c.e.o. of High Brew Coffee

“Our team conducted internal research that determined approximately one-third of coffee consumers have an aversion to stevia, leading us to the decision to remove the sweetener from our dark chocolate mocha, salted caramel and Mexican vanilla flavors,” said David Smith, chief executive officer of High Brew Coffee. “Our new formulas are sweetened using only natural cane sugar, meaning our entire product line is now stevia-free. These new formulations allow for a more robust flavor profile, while keeping these indulgent flavors at only 90 calories, making them a better-for-you option among our competitors.”

High Brew Coffee was founded in 2014 by Mr. Smith, previously the co-founder of Sweet Leaf Tea. 
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