Daypart-specific products piquing consumer interest

by Rebekah Schouten
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Stonyfield Farm Oh My Yog! Yogurt
Stonyfield’s recently launched dessert-inspired Oh My Yog! yogurts make them a viable post-dinner treat.

LONDON — More than a quarter of global consumers consider food and drink appealing if products are advertised for consumption at a specific time of day, according to research by consumer insight firm Canadean.

Tanvi Savara, Canadean
Tanvi Savara, consumer insight analyst at Canadean

“Habitual consumers respond well to daypart-specific launches from their preferred brands,” said Tanvi Savara, consumer insight analyst at Canadean. “Nearly a third of regular soft drink consumers find time-specific products appealing. Similarly, 34% of regular snackers find themselves tempted by products advertised for consumption at a specific time of the day.”

Millennials top the list of those most interested in time-of-day positioning, Ms. Savara said. Canadean’s report found that one-third of consumers aged 18-34 find food products advertised for consumption at a specific time of day or night appealing.

“Interestingly, the U.S. stands apart from its Western counterparts with 44% of American millennials agreeing with this, a much higher figure than the U.K. or other European countries,” she said.

Cadbury Dairy Milk Medley, Mondelez
Cadbury’s Dairy Milk Medley incorporates ingredients reminiscent of meals or desserts to extend consumption into new times of the day.

This consumer interest has led to several brands launching new products targeted toward a specific time of day. For example, Cadbury’s Dairy Milk Medley incorporates ingredients reminiscent of meals or desserts to extend consumption into new times of the day, Ms. Savara said.

The yogurt category in particular has introduced several innovations that appeal to or redefine specific dayparts.

“Stonyfield’s recently launched dessert-inspired Oh My Yog! yogurts make them a viable post-dinner treat, while Yoplait’s Plenti Oatmeal Meets Greek Yogurt claims to ‘reinvent breakfast,’” Ms. Savara said. “Alpina Café Selections yogurt claims to have caffeine content equivalent to about half a cup of coffee and is positioned as the ‘perfect addition to anyone’s morning or afternoon routine.’”

Plenti Greek Yogurt Meets Oatmeal, Alpina Cafe Selections yogurt
Yoplait’s Plenti Oatmeal Meets Greek Yogurt claims to ‘reinvent breakfast,and Alpina Café Selections yogurt is positioned as the ‘perfect addition to anyone’s morning or afternoon routine.’”

While this daypart-specific movement may seem to contradict the burgeoning all-day breakfast trend, Ms. Savara said these trends go hand-in-hand.

“The reason why all-day breakfast menus have appeal is because there is a novelty factor associated with moving breakfast from being traditionally consumed only in the morning to other parts of the day, opening up new consumption occasions,” Ms. Savara said. “Daypart targeting can be used not only to create specific consumption niches, but also expand, and redefine consumption occasions.”

McDonald's all-day breakfast
All-day breakfast offerings open new consumption occasions.

While time-specific products appeal very strongly to those who are brand loyal, Ms. Savara said, brands that implement this daypart advertising and innovation have an opportunity to target a wider consumer base.

“Brands seeking to leverage time-of-day positioning successfully should not just identify the daypart for which a product is formulated, but also address the purchase motivations that are most relevant for that daypart, through formulation and marketing,” she said. “For example, consumers are more likely to snack on health-oriented choices such as fruit and yogurt earlier in the day, whereas indulgence is more likely to be an influence towards the end of the day, with chocolate or savory snacks preferred late at night.” 
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