Bay State's SimplySafe process reduces Salmonella risk

by Jeff Gelski
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Muesli, granola
SimplySafe is validated to achieve up to a 5-log reduction in Salmonella in applications like cold-pressed bars, granolas, muesli and snack mixes.
 

QUINCY, MASS. — Bay State Milling Co. has introduced SimplySafe, a natural heat treatment process for whole grains and seeds.

While many manufacturing processes include a step such as baking that reduces microbial pathogens, other applications like cold-pressed bars, granolas, muesli and snack mixes are void of a kill step. SimplySafe is validated to achieve up to a 5-log reduction in Salmonella in such products, and it also minimizes the risk of food borne illness and recalls when applied to ingredients used in the products, according to Quincy-based Bay State Milling.

Jennifer Robinson, Bay State Milling
Jennifer Robinson, vice-president of corporate quality assurance for Bay State Milling

“As FSMA (Food Safety Modernization Act) shifts the way the industry addresses food safety, we’re extremely fortunate to be able to offer our customers a technology like SimplySafe,” said Jennifer Robinson, vice-president of corporate quality assurance for Bay State Milling. “Our proprietary process significantly reduces the risk of potential Salmonella contamination, the main pathogen of concern in whole grains and seeds.”

SimplySafe may be used to treat whole grains, whole seeds and blends. The technology maintains organic and gluten-free certifications. SimplySafe has no impact on the original ingredient as it maintains flavor, appearance and functionality, according to Bay State Milling.

Bay State Milling’s facility in Bolingbrook, Ill., offers the heat treatment process. The company plans to expand the capability to its facility in Woodland, Calif., early in 2018. 
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