Nestle expands Healthy Kids program to Nigeria

by Eric Schroeder
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VEVEY, SWITZERLAND — Nestle S.A. has extended its Nestle Healthy Kids Global Programme to Nigeria, where the company will help teachers educate schoolchildren about nutrition.

The worldwide initiative is focused on improving the nutrition, health and wellness of children aged 6-12 years old by promoting nutrition education, a balanced diet, greater physical activity and a healthy lifestyle.

As part of its launch in Nigeria, Nestle led a workshop for teachers to illustrate how they may play a central role in raising awareness to schoolchildren.

“The project aims at looking at the future of a child where they will learn and use that information to improve the health status of his/her family in adulthood,” said Iquo Ukoh, consumer maximization manager for Nestle Nigeria, Ms. Ukoh said she also reminded teachers in Nigeria that the Nestle Healthy Kids Programme is more than a short-term educational tool.

“Go beyond teaching them to pass their exams,” she said. “Teach them to use the knowledge acquired to make an impact on their own lives and that of their communities.”

The program was supported by the Centre for Health, Population and Nutrition in Nigeria, and also was backed by the Nigerian Lagos State Government.

“Indeed, school health programs such as the Nestle Healthy Kids initiative can help children and adolescents attain full educational potential and good health by providing them with the skills, social support and environmental reinforcement they need in order to adopt long-term healthy eating behaviors,” said Khadijat Gbolahan-Daodu, executive chairman of the Lagos State Government Universal Education Board.

The Healthy Kids Global Programme was launched in April 2009 and eventually will be extended to all countries where Nestle has direct operations.

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