Cupcakes
Eating dessert after breakfast could help people lose weight.
 

Cake: The new power breakfast?

When in the course of developing its Cutting Edge Culinary Trends for 2017 report, the culinary staff at Sterling-Rice Group, the Boulder, Colo.-based market research/branding innovation development firm created the mantra, “Wake-Cake.” Distilling information presented in studies from Syracuse University and Tel Aviv University, the team concluded “there’s no need to wait until after dinner to enjoy dessert. Feel free to wake, [eat] cake, and attack your day with a focused brain.”

In fact, according to Liz Moskow, the company’s culinary director, eating dessert after breakfast could help people lose weight. “This way, you have as much awake and active time as possible to burn those calories during the day,” she said. For some, the best news is that “a daily dose of chocolate improves cognitive abilities, such as memory and abstract reasoning.”

Ms. Moscow goes on to warn that this chocolate cake or chocolate-laden dessert in moderation “shouldn’t be a huge calorie bomb or a giant portion of uber sweet chocolate goo, but a quality pastry made with dark chocolate — about 70% cocoa — and other healthful ingredients; it can be the new ‘Power Breakfast.’”