Caffeine, coffee, energy drinks
The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 generally support the safety of caffeine but issue some caution.
 

Dietary Guidelines express caution for caffeine

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 generally support the safety of caffeine but issue some caution. Moderate coffee consumption (three to five 8-oz cups per/day or providing up to 400 mg per day of caffeine) can be incorporated into healthy eating patterns, according to the Dietary Guidelines.

“This guidance on coffee is informed by strong and consistent evidence showing that, in healthy adults, moderate coffee consumption is not associated with an increased risk of major chronic diseases (e.g., cancer) or premature death, especially from (cardiovascular disease),” the Dietary Guidelines said.

Energy drinks were addressed, too.

Baobab energy drink
Baobab may provide a health halo with a difference to energy drink brands.
 


“Limited and mixed evidence is available from randomized controlled trials examining the relationship between those energy drinks which have high caffeine content and cardiovascular risk factors and other health outcomes,” the Dietary Guidelines said.

People who drink alcohol should be cautious about mixing caffeine and alcohol, according to the Dietary Guidelines, and women who are capable of becoming pregnant or who are trying to, or who are pregnant, and those who are breastfeeding should consult their health care providers for advice concerning caffeine consumption.